Choosing Blessing

My experience, of course, does not trump truth. God, after all, is true, and every man a liar. That same lying spirit, however, also infects our arguments. We yet hold onto a modernist conceit that when we are stacking syllogisms, and citing learned reports we can actually do so as neutral, dispassionate scientists. Now it is the postmodern conceit that suggests that we can’t really know anything, that our propensity to lie has spun an inescapable solipsistic web around us. Sound arguments exist, can be followed, and minds can actually get closer to the truth. It’s just not that easy.

What follows, a list of observations on some issues that we struggle with, is not designed to be a careful, exegetical argument. Neither, because what follows is experiential, is it designed to thwart careful, exegetical arguments. These are just some observations that I think we should think about.

First, I have never met a Christian homeschooling parent that regretted the decision to homeschool. I have met countless Christian parents who have chosen the government’s schools for their children who regret their decision.

Second, I have never met a Christian parent that regretted adopting a posture of welcoming children as blessings from the hand of God. I have met countless Christian parents who regret embracing sundry technologies to try to avoid adding new children to their families.

Third, I have never met a Christian that regretted faithfully paying a tithe to the church from their income. I have met many Christians who regret failing to do so.

Fourth, I have never met a Christian that regretted the time spent with their own children. I have met countless Christians who regret not spending more time with their own children.

Fifth, I have never met a Christian husband or wife who regretted having his wife cover her head when gathered for corporate worship. I have met Christian husbands and wives who regret not having done so earlier.

Sixth, I have never been to a church that regretted celebrating the Lord’s Supper each and every Lord’s Day. I know of many churches that regret failing to do so.

Seventh, I have never met a family that regretted spending the copious amounts of money it can take to adopt a child. I have met many families that regret buying boats and rv’s and vacations and fancy, new cars.

Eighth, I know of no father that regrets deciding to actively seek to guard the hearts of his daughters as they prepare for marriage. I know many fathers who regret failing to do so.

Ninth, I know of no family that regrets faithfully having family worship. I know many families that regret failing to do so.

Tenth, I have never met a family that wished they had been less gospel-focused. I have met many that regret not being more gospel focused.

Nothing above argues that any of the choices above are in themselves sins. They may be, but that argument is not being made. Nothing in fact argues that there aren’t people whose experience is different. Nothing above suggests that any of the choices above are matters of eternal life or death for the one making the choices. Nothing in the above suggests that these are the most important issues that we need to grapple with. Nothing above suggests that those who choose the latter route will have miserable lives. Nothing above suggests that those who choose the former choice are better Christians than those who choose the latter. All of the above, I hope, gently encourages us to consider if our rationalizations of our choices might just have caused us to miss the greater blessing.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10103922738438801967 NewKidontheBlogg

    I have never met a Christian who regrets all of the time they invest in meditating on God's Word.

    I love your smiles for your children that you tweeted on Facebook. We can never regret those smiles.

    Enjoyed this post.

  • Anonymous

    Can you give me more detail on the head covering mentioned in #5. Thanks for standing up for the truth. Sincerely Mark in Oregon.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/13976580613129096869 R.C.

    Mark,
    Take a look at I Corinthians 11. REad any commentary written more than sixty years ago. Up until that point, for over 1800 years, the entire church held that the Bible taught that women should have their heads covered when gathered for corporate worship. Now since then many good men have disagreed, but I am not one of them. a simple google search on headcovering will provide more info than you could ever read.

  • http://www.vocationalvisions.blogspot.com David

    Amen Brother on all ten. God Bless Now! Praying for you all and hope Denise is healing well.