Five Reasons You Should Go to Your Local Abortion Mill

I know it is a scary thought. I know it is outside our comfort zone. And so at best we pray for those who go, those spiritual super-heroes that are better than we are. At worst we get angry at them for making us feel guilty. Going to the mill, however, will not save your soul, will not assuage your guilt. Jesus did that. If you will go, however, you will no longer fear, but will know that He is with you, wherever you go. Here then are five reasons you should go, pray, speak.
First, you should go to feel the power of repentance. There is no place, outside the Lord’s Table, more powerful in demonstrating the depth of our sin. Though I am actively pro-life I go and repent for these things. First, for my country. I am a part of this country and so share in its guilt. While we should always and everywhere be grateful for all the blessings we receive, going to a mill cures my head-in-the-sand, proud-to-be-an-American folly. Instead I am rightly ashamed. I am a citizen of a nation that over the last forty years has murdered fifty million babies. Second, for His church. I am a part of His church and so share in its guilt.  We are like the Christians of Germany during the Holocaust, except these victims are murdered in plain sight. Again, though I am to be grateful for how the grace of God is manifest in and through His church, being at the mill cures me of the foolish notion that the church is innocent, that the battle between the seed of the woman and the seed of the serpent is an “out there” thing rather than an “in here” thing. Third, I repent for myself. Being there never cleanses me from my guilt. I cannot stand there and pray, “I thank you God that I am not like other men. I preach at mills and adopt babies.” Instead I weep for my forgetting, and for my not doing enough.
Second, you should go to experience the power of the devil. Non-charismatic evangelicals are unhealthily skittish about the reality of spiritual warfare. We are practical modernists, believing the invisible realm doesn’t touch this realm. You cannot make that mistake at a killing center. The sense of demonic presence is oppressive, weighty.  Never is that power greater than when proclaiming Jesus to those leading their little ones to death. The devil doesn’t take well to our kneeling before His gates.
Third, you should go to experience the power of conviction. The devil has persuaded Christians and non-Christians that this “procedure” is normal, no big deal. When you are there, without even a spoken word, you are communicating to yourself and others these great truths- that what they are about to do is wicked; that what they are about to do is noticed; that what they are about to do is not normal; that what they are about to do they will regret. When Christians especially show up to murder their babies, they see Jesus in you and often they turn around, repenting.
Fourth, you should go to experience the power of the Holy Spirit. Again, evangelicals, especially Reformed evangelicals, are skittish about the Holy Spirit. We are willing to speak of Him in the abstract, but we don’t expect to witness Him at work. He does work, and nowhere more visibly than at the very gates of hell. The Spirit does great things when we follow Him into great battles.  He tears down strongholds before our very eyes.
Fifth, you should go to experience the power of family. When you are there to watch fathers and mothers murder their babies you cannot help but give thanks that He spared your children, to rejoice that they survived the battle of the womb. When you are there together with your family, you enjoy the blessings of all of the above, together. You will go home united, tearful, and grateful.
You need to go. You don’t need to preach, though you may. You don’t need to carry a sign, though you may. You don’t need to hand out tracts, though you may. But you must go. I have met many who regret not going. I know no one who has ever regretted going. Show them Jesus, and you will see Jesus at work.
  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/00784757285457791293 Unknown

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  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/00784757285457791293 Unknown

    I can't believe you wrote this. Thank you so much. This is the first public support from a known preacher for the pro-life movement at the gates of abortion clinics that I have ever witnessed. I have watched my family and friends ridiculed by members of every single church I have been a part of. No matter how often I say the words you have said they do nothing but fail to echo in the heads of believers who know nothing more than numbers in the great abortion holocaust. -Jesse Aughenbaugh

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/09339201838263627245 David Bayly

    Amen. I praise God that our church has had a faithful witnesses at a local clinic week-in and week-out on abortion days for over a year now–including in the rain and on 15 degree mornings. The joy of seeing a newborn baby brought to church by a mother convinced not to have an abortion by witnesses from our church was immense. In addition, the adopted children with us each Sunday because of this ministry are a sign of God's glory in our midst.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/08891402278361538353 Truth Unites… and Divides

    I have never participated in any protests of any kind. They conjure up images of the Silly '60's and their ridiculous hippie protests. Not to mention the dumb Occupy Movement protesters.

    But this is one issue where I might show up. Thanks for posting this.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/06242793531954844979 Henry

    Hi rcjr,

    I tried to answer your comment about my incorrect information on your father's view on headcoverings on the Challies blog but my comment is not showing up for some reason, so here it is:

    Thanks for the correction and stopping this rumour in its tracks. I heard it on April 25th from 'Allan' over at Baylyblog in the comment section of a post called "Most of (Redeemer's ministry leaders) were women". I will post a correction over there also.

    So I happily rephrase my question for Dr Sproul: What was most instrumental in making you come to your unusual conviction on headcoverings? Do you think the practice will slip away from the Western church entirely, or do you think God will cause his people to return to this age-old Christian tradition? Does your minority status in this matter make you wonder whether you might be wrong? Have other Christian leaders you've met ever commented on your practice?

    Hope this is ok,